UK cuts red tape for ‘low level’ lotteries

UK cuts red tape for ‘low level’ lotteries

Here’s a piece of good news for some lotteries in the United Kingdom: less government red tape.

The UK Gambling Commission recently announced that it is cutting the red tape linked to running lotteries for good causes starting April 6, following a number of change in the Gambling Act, which, in turn, led to a decrease in the requirements needed to run some low level lotteries.

Thanks to the new changes, private society lotteries can now be promoted by members of a private society for any charitable or non-commercial purpose as opposed to the previous government rule that allows lotteries to be promoted only “for the purposes for which the society is conducted.”

Meanwhile, work lotteries can now be used for fundraising for any purpose other than private or commercial gain. In the past, work lotteries were not allowed to be used for fundraising and all money collected had to be used for prizes or expenses incurred in organising the lottery.

Also, residents’ lotteries can be used for fundraising for any purpose other than private or commercial gain. Residents’ lotteries were previously not allowed as a fundraising activity, and all money collected had to be used for prizes or expenses incurred in organising the lottery.

In addition, the gambling commission has also removed the requirement for these three types of lottery to contain certain information, but all other existing rules will remain the same.

Incidental lotteries, on the other hand, can now be be held at both non-commercial and commercial events to raise money for charities and other good causes. However, this type of lottery cannot be operated for private or commercial gains. According to the commission, lottery results can now be announced during or after the event, but all other existing rules remain the same, including the rule requiring that tickets can only be sold at the event and while it is taking place.

These changes are actually a product of the country’s Red Tape Challenge, which had the previous government ask sport, heritage, gambling and lottery industries to “name and shame the regulations” that are holding back their businesses.

Minister for Gambling and Lotteries David Evennett said fundraisers and charities will greatly benefit from the loss of red tape.

“[The] government’s decision to remove this unnecessary red tape will be of great benefit to charities and good causes, encouraging more people to hold small lotteries and raffles,” Evennett said. “Money raised through lotteries makes a huge difference to local communities and this change in the law will ensure they continue to thrive.”